Herbie Popnecker

Herbie Popnecker
Examples of Recurring Themes

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Herbie Claus, stuck in a chimney

Herbie Popnecker Examples:
Recurring Gags:
Breaking the 4th Wall

Created: 2005-03-13     Updated: 2013-01-05  
Stories: 16     Examples: 22     Links: 10  

Related:

Like many cartoons, characters in Herbie comics break the 4th wall and refer to being in a comic and address the audience. Herbie went further by breaking the 4th wall of stories within the comic.

Herbie breaks into a movie to hit up Cary Grant for money and Herbie grabs thought balloons and even climbs in. There are even references to Herbie's creators: Richard E. Hughes and Ogden Whitney. In addition to these examples, Herbie's shrugs are examples of breaking the 4th wall to speak to the audience.

Index terms: self-reference, breaking the fourth wall, talking to the reader, metafiction, meta-reference, recursion, Richard E. Hughes, Ogden Whitney

Dad is first, in FW #116, to refer to being in a comic story.
Source: Forbidden Worlds #116 p.2 (1963-11)
Updated: 2005-03-13
Dad is first, in FW #116 , to refer to being in a comic story.
A science fiction writer who looks like Richard E. Hughes pitches a story that is like the one he is in. Who'd ever believe that?
Source: Herbie #2a p.8 (1964-06)
Updated: 2008-11-20
A science fiction writer who looks like Richard E.
Herbie, desperate for money to save his dad, interrupts a movie in #3b to ask for a donation for a worthy cause.
Source: Herbie #3b p.9 (1964-08)
Updated: 2008-11-20
Herbie, desperate for money to save his dad , interrupts a movie in #3b to ask for a donation for a worthy cause.
Big fat mess, readers.
Source: Herbie #4a p.11 (1964-09)
Updated: 2008-11-21
Big fat mess, readers.
A lion in #6a refers to what happened to an elephant in #5a.
Source: Herbie #6a p.7 (1964-12)
Updated: 2005-03-13
A lion in #6a refers to what happened to an elephant in #5a .
Herbie arises to narrate the story...
Source: Herbie #7a p.1 (1965-02)
Updated: 2008-11-20
Herbie arises to narrate the story...
...and ends with a threat to the reader.
Source: Herbie #7a p.13 (1965-02)
Updated: 2008-11-20
...and ends with a threat to the reader .
Herbie looks at the reader in disbelief as Dad talks brave. HEH-HEH...
Source: Herbie #7b p.8 (1965-02)
Updated: 2013-01-04
Herbie looks at the reader in disbelief as Dad talks brave.
Herbie looks over pictures of real costume heroes, including Skyman, a costume hero drawn by Ogden Whitney in the 1940s.
Source: Herbie #8a p.4 (1965-03)
Updated: 2008-11-20
Herbie looks over pictures of real costume heroes, including Skyman , a costume hero drawn by Ogden Whitney in the 1940s.
Prime Example: Explaining how he uses lollipops for time-travel, Herbie makes a point of assuring the reader that he is not disobeying his dad. This might be something required by the Comics Code Authority, which frowned on promoting bad behavior.
Source: Herbie #8b p.3 (1965-03)
Updated: 2005-03-13
Prime Example : Explaining how he uses lollipops for time-travel , Herbie makes a point of assuring the reader that he is not disobeying his dad.
In #11a, when Herbie's dad tells a warped story about Abraham Lincoln: Lincoln's statue looks at the thought balloon with concern; Herbie climbs into the story to help; Herbie defeats the bear and the Redcoats and puts out the fire; Herbie jumps out and is thanked by Lincoln's statue.
Source: Herbie #11a p.3 (1965-08)
Updated: 2005-03-13
In #11a , when Herbie's dad tells a warped story about Abraham Lincoln: Lincoln's statue looks at the thought balloon with concern; Herbie climbs into the story to help; Herbie defeats the bear and the Redcoats and puts out the fire; Herbie jumps out and is thanked by Lincoln's statue.
Heroes Nemesis, Magicman, and Fat Fury refer to the comics they come from.
Source: Herbie #14a p.10 (1965-12)
Updated: 2008-11-20
Heroes Nemesis, Magicman, and Fat Fury refer to the comics they come from.
Herbie narrates this historical story about his father, Pincus Popnecker.
Source: Herbie #15a p.1 (1966-02)
Updated: 2008-11-20
Herbie narrates this historical story about his father, Pincus Popnecker.
In #15a, Herbie grabs his father's rival Pud Bimbo's thought balloon.
Source: Herbie #15a p.2 (1966-02)
Updated: 2005-03-13
In #15a , Herbie grabs his father's rival Pud Bimbo's thought balloon.
Herbie sums it all up for us, and threatens us.
Source: Herbie #15a p.17 (1966-02)
Updated: 2005-03-14
Herbie sums it all up for us, and threatens us .
Spaceman from planet Sauerkraut is a Herbie comic fan.
Source: Herbie #15b p.2 (1966-02)
Updated: 2008-12-06
Spaceman from planet Sauerkraut is a Herbie comic fan.
Herbie asks for two lollipops to restore his and Napoleon's age to what it was at the "beginning of last page".
Source: Herbie #15b p.8 (1966-02)
Updated: 2005-03-13
Herbie asks for two lollipops to restore his and Napoleon's age to what it was at the "beginning of last page".
In #16b, Herbie tells us a story.
Source: Herbie #16b p.1 (1966-03)
Updated: 2008-11-21
In #16b , Herbie tells us a story.
Herbie looks at, comments on, and interacts with himself in some thought balloons.
Source: Herbie #16b p.3 (1966-03)
Updated: 2005-03-13
Herbie looks at, comments on, and interacts with himself in some thought balloons.
At the end of #16b, Herbie talks to, and threatens the reader.
Source: Herbie #16b p.9 (1966-03)
Updated: 2005-03-13
At the end of #16b , Herbie talks to, and threatens the reader .
Herbie, as the Fat Fury, is looking at us and thinking at us.
Source: Herbie #20a p.14 (1966-09)
Updated: 2012-01-21
Herbie, as the Fat Fury, is looking at us and thinking at us.
Herbie tells us who we are seeing in disguise, and why.
Source: Herbie #23a p.14 (1967-02)
Updated: 2005-03-14
Herbie tells us who we are seeing in disguise , and why.
4th-wall